Medical College of Wisconsin
CTSICores SearchResearch InformaticsREDCap

Factors Associated With Unplanned 30-Day Readmissions After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Among US Hospitals. JAMA Netw Open 2019 07 03;2(7):e196476

Date

07/06/2019

Pubmed ID

31276175

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.6476

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85068511187   2 Citations

Abstract

Importance: Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a therapeutic strategy in the management of several hematological cancers. Limited data exist on the incidence and predictors of 30-day readmission after HCT.

Objective: To measure the incidence of and risk factors associated with 30-day readmission following HCT in the United States.

Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study examined patient data from the US population-based Nationwide Readmissions Database. All adults (age ≥18 years) who underwent autologous (auto-) or allogenic (allo-) HCT in US hospitals between January 1, 2012, and November 30, 2014, were included. The analysis was performed from June 2018 to February 2019.

Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcome was 30-day readmission rates for auto-HCT and allo-HCT. Factors associated with readmission, including baseline demographic characteristics and disease- and hospital-related characteristics (including annual case volume), were measured.

Results: A total of 28 356 index admissions for auto-HCT in 244 centers (191 low-volume, 38 medium-volume, and 15 high-volume centers) and 17 217 index admissions for allo-HCT in 211 centers (161 low-volume, 37 medium-volume, and 13 high-volume centers) were identified during the study period. The overall 30-day readmission rates were 11.6% for auto-HCT and 24.4% for allo-HCT. The odds of readmission were significantly higher in low-volume hospitals compared with high-volume hospitals (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.69; 95% CI, 1.08-2.64 for auto-HCT and aOR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.09-1.82 for allo-HCT) but comparable to medium-volume hospitals (aOR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.62-1.83 for auto-HCT and aOR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.90-1.57 for allo-HCT). Other factors associated with readmission for auto-HCT included younger age (aOR for age ≥50 vs <49 years, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68-0.98), female sex (aOR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.06-1.36), disease type (aOR for other vs myeloma, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.06-1.77), and Elixhauser comorbidity index score (aOR for ≥20 vs 0, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.17-1.93). For allo-HCT, factors associated with readmission included disease type (aOR for acute lymphoblastic leukemia vs acute myelogenous leukemia, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.04-1.62), insurance (aOR for Medicare vs private, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.02-1.36), and Elixhauser comorbidity index score (aOR for 1-9 vs 0, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.04-1.39). Infections, neutropenic fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms were the most common reasons for readmission for both types of HCT.

Conclusions and Relevance: This study found substantial rates of readmission for both types of HCT and an inverse association between hospital HCT volume and 30-day readmission. These results may provide guidance when developing quality indicators and policies penalizing hospitals for HCT readmission.

Author List

Dhakal B, Giri S, Levin A, Rein L, Fenske TS, Chhabra S, Shah NN, Szabo A, D'Souza A, Pasquini M, Hari P, Hamadani M

Authors

Saurabh Chhabra MD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Anita D'Souza MD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Binod Dhakal MD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Timothy Fenske MD Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Mehdi H. Hamadani MD Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Parameswaran Hari MD Chief, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Marcelo C. Pasquini MD, MS Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Nirav N. Shah MD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Aniko Szabo PhD Professor in the Institute for Health and Equity department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
Cohort Studies
Febrile Neutropenia
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Hematologic Neoplasms
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Hospitals
Humans
Insurance, Health
Male
Patient Readmission
Postoperative Complications
Risk Factors
United States
jenkins-FCD Prod-482 91ad8a360b6da540234915ea01ff80e38bfdb40a