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Magnetic resonance-guided stereotactic laser ablation therapy for the treatment of pediatric brain tumors: a multiinstitutional retrospective study. J Neurosurg Pediatr 2020 Mar 27:1-9

Date

03/29/2020

Pubmed ID

32217793

DOI

10.3171/2020.1.PEDS19496

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85087970947   2 Citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of MR-guided stereotactic laser ablation (SLA) therapy in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors.

METHODS: Data from 17 North American centers were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical, technical, and radiographic data for pediatric patients treated with SLA for a diagnosis of brain tumor from 2008 to 2016 were collected and analyzed.

RESULTS: A total of 86 patients (mean age 12.2 ± 4.5 years) with 76 low-grade (I or II) and 10 high-grade (III or IV) tumors were included. Tumor location included lobar (38.4%), deep (45.3%), and cerebellar (16.3%) compartments. The mean follow-up time was 24 months (median 18 months, range 3-72 months). At the last follow-up, the volume of SLA-treated tumors had decreased in 80.6% of patients with follow-up data. Patients with high-grade tumors were more likely to have an unchanged or larger tumor size after SLA treatment than those with low-grade tumors (OR 7.49, p = 0.0364). Subsequent surgery and adjuvant treatment were not required after SLA treatment in 90.4% and 86.7% of patients, respectively. Patients with high-grade tumors were more likely to receive subsequent surgery (OR 2.25, p = 0.4957) and adjuvant treatment (OR 3.77, p = 0.1711) after SLA therapy, without reaching significance. A total of 29 acute complications in 23 patients were reported and included malpositioned catheters (n = 3), intracranial hemorrhages (n = 2), transient neurological deficits (n = 11), permanent neurological deficits (n = 5), symptomatic perilesional edema (n = 2), hydrocephalus (n = 4), and death (n = 2). On long-term follow-up, 3 patients were reported to have worsened neuropsychological test results. Pre-SLA tumor volume, tumor location, number of laser trajectories, and number of lesions created did not result in a significantly increased risk of complications; however, the odds of complications increased by 14% (OR 1.14, p = 0.0159) with every 1-cm3 increase in the volume of the lesion created.

CONCLUSIONS: SLA is an effective, minimally invasive treatment option for pediatric brain tumors, although it is not without risks. Limiting the volume of the generated thermal lesion may help decrease the incidence of complications.

Author List

Arocho-Quinones EV, Lew SM, Handler MH, Tovar-Spinoza Z, Smyth M, Bollo R, Donahue D, Perry MS, Levy ML, Gonda D, Mangano FT, Storm PB, Price AV, Couture DE, Oluigbo C, Duhaime AC, Barnett GH, Muh CR, Sather MD, Fallah A, Wang AC, Bhatia S, Patel K, Tarima S, Graber S, Huckins S, Hafez DM, Rumalla K, Bailey L, Shandley S, Roach A, Alexander E, Jenkins W, Tsering D, Price G, Meola A, Evanoff W, Thompson EM, Brandmeir N, Pediatric Stereotactic Laser Ablation Workgroup

Authors

Sean Lew MD Chief, Professor in the Neurosurgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Sergey S. Tarima PhD Associate Professor in the Institute for Health and Equity department at Medical College of Wisconsin




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