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Technical Note: Comprehensive performance tests of the first clinical real-time motion tracking and compensation system using MLC and jaws. Med Phys 2020 Jul;47(7):2814-2825

Date

04/12/2020

Pubmed ID

32277477

DOI

10.1002/mp.14171

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85084444735   1 Citation

Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of the first clinical real-time motion tracking and compensation system using multileaf collimator (MLC) and jaws during helical tomotherapy delivery.

METHODS: Appropriate mechanical and dosimetry tests were performed on the first clinical real-time motion tracking system (Synchrony on Radixact, Accuray Inc) recently installed in our institution. kV radiography dose was measured by CTDIw using a pencil chamber. Changes of beam characteristics with jaw offset and MLC leaf shift were evaluated. Various dosimeters and phantoms including A1SL ion chamber (Standard Imaging), Gafchromic EBT3 films (Ashland), TomoPhantom (Med Cal), ArcCheck (Sun Nuclear), Delta4 (ScandiDos), with fiducial or high contrast inserts, placed on two dynamical motion platforms (CIRS dynamic motion-CIRS, Hexamotion-ScandiDos), were used to assess the dosimetric accuracy of the available Synchrony modalities: fiducial tracking with nonrespiratory motion (FNR), fiducial tracking with respiratory modeling (FR), and fiducial free (e.g., lung tumor tracking) with respiratory modeling (FFR). Motion detection accuracy of a tracking target, defined as the difference between the predicted and instructed target positions, was evaluated with the root mean square (RMS). The dose accuracy of motion compensation was evaluated by verifying the dose output constancy and by comparing measured and planned (predicted) three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions based on gamma analysis.

RESULTS: The measured CTDIw for a single radiograph with a 120 kVp and 1.6 mAs protocol was 0.084 mGy, implying a low imaging dose of 8.4 mGy for a typical Synchrony motion tracking fraction with 100 radiographs. The dosimetric effect of the jaw swing or MLC leaf shift was minimal on depth dose (<0.5%) and was <2% on both beam profile width and output for typical motions. The motion detection accuracies, that is, RMS, were 0.84, 1.13, and 0.48 mm for FNR, FR, and FFR, respectively, well within the 1.5 mm recommended tolerance. Dose constancy with Synchrony was found to be within 2%. The gamma passing rates of 3D dose measurements for a variety of Synchrony plans were well within the acceptable level.

CONCLUSIONS: The motion tracking and compensation using kV radiography, MLC shifting, and jaw swing during helical tomotherapy delivery was tested to be mechanically and dosimetrically accurate for clinical use.

Author List

Chen GP, Tai A, Keiper TD, Lim S, Li XA

Authors

X Allen Li PhD Professor in the Radiation Oncology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
An Tai PhD Associate Professor in the Radiation Oncology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




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