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Determination of language dominance in pediatric patients with epilepsy for clinical decision-making: Correspondence of intracarotid amobarbitol procedure and fMRI modalities. Epilepsy Behav 2021 08;121(Pt A):108041

Date

06/04/2021

Pubmed ID

34082317

DOI

10.1016/j.yebeh.2021.108041

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85107028295

Abstract

Identification of the language dominant hemisphere is an essential part of the evaluation of potential pediatric epilepsy surgery patients. Historically, language dominance has been determined using the intracarotid amobarbitol procedure (IAP), but use of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scanning is becoming more common. Few studies examine the correspondence between fMRI and IAP in pediatric samples. The current study examined the agreement of hemispheric lateralization as determined by fMRI and IAP in a consecutive sample of 10 pediatric patients with epilepsy evaluated for epilepsy surgery. Data showed a strong correlation between IAP and fMRI lateralilty indices (r=.91) and 70% agreement in determination of hemispheric dominance, despite increased demonstration of bilateral or atypical language representation in this pediatric sample. Clinical implications and interpretation challenges are discussed.

Author List

Koop JI, Credille K, Wang Y, Loman M, Marashly A, Kim I, Lew SM, Maheshwari M

Authors

Jennifer I. Koop Olsta PhD Professor in the Neurology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Sean Lew MD Chief, Professor in the Neurosurgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Michelle Loman Moudry PhD Assistant Professor in the Neurology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Mohit Maheshwari MD Professor in the Radiology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Yang Wang MD Professor in the Radiology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Amobarbital
Brain Mapping
Cerebral Cortex
Child
Clinical Decision-Making
Dominance, Cerebral
Epilepsy
Functional Laterality
Humans
Language
Magnetic Resonance Imaging