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Phosphatidylethanolamine at the luminal endothelial surface--implications for hemostasis and thrombotic autoimmunity. Clin Appl Thromb Hemost 2011 Apr;17(2):158-63

Date

11/12/2009

Pubmed ID

19903695

Pubmed Central ID

PMC3866907

DOI

10.1177/1076029609350620

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-79952800293   14 Citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Accumulating evidence suggests that phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is physically present at the luminal endothelial surface, where it tentatively functions as a critical anticoagulant. The goal of the current investigation was 3-fold: to characterize the distribution profile of PE at the luminal endothelial surface; to examine the immunoreactivity to the vascular endothelium by anti-PE (aPE) sera from patients presenting with thrombosis; and to discuss the potential mechanism of PE upregulation by endothelial cells.

METHODS: The rat aortic arch was selected as major conduit vessel under significant hemodynamic burden. The presence of PE and the antigenic profile of aPE sera at the luminal endothelial surface were examined using duramycin as a PEbinding probe and immunohistochemistry. Phosphatidylethanolamine upregulation at endothelial cell surface was investigated using cultured monolayer subject to laminar shear stress or thrombin treatment.

RESULTS: High levels of PE were detected at the luminal endothelial surface of aortic flow dividers, the ascending aorta, and the outer curvature of the aortic arch. The antigenic profiles of aPE sera, which are highly associated with elevated thrombotic risks in patients, are consistent with PE distribution along the endothelial surface. Finally, PE is upregulated at the surface of cultured endothelial cells in response to luminal shear stress but not thrombin.

CONCLUSIONS: The current data describe the physical distribution of vascular PE at the blood-endothelium interface. The luminal PE presents a vulnerability to anti-PE autoimmunity and is consistent with the association between aPE and elevated risk for idiopathic thrombosis.

Author List

Zhixin Li, Wells CW, North PE, Kumar S, Duris CB, McIntyre JA, Ming Zhao

Authors

Suresh Kumar PhD Associate Professor in the Pathology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Paula E. North MD, PhD Professor in the Pathology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Animals
Anticoagulants
Aorta
Autoantibodies
Autoimmunity
Bacteriocins
Cattle
Endothelium
Hemostasis
Hemostatics
Peptides
Phosphatidylethanolamines
Rats
Thrombin
Thrombosis
Up-Regulation
jenkins-FCD Prod-482 91ad8a360b6da540234915ea01ff80e38bfdb40a