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Factors influencing weight gain after renal transplantation. Transplantation 1993 Oct;56(4):822-7

Date

10/01/1993

Pubmed ID

8212200

DOI

10.1097/00007890-199310000-00008

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-0027374003   126 Citations

Abstract

Weight gain following renal transplantation occurs frequently but has not been investigated quantitatively. A retrospective chart review of 115 adult renal transplant recipients was used to describe patterns of weight gain during the first 5 years after transplantation. Only 23 subjects (21%) were overweight before their transplant. Sixty-six subjects (57%) experienced a weight gain of greater than or equal to 10%, and 49 subjects (43%) were overweight according to Metropolitan relative weight criteria at 1 year after transplantation. There was an inverse correlation between advancing age and weight gain, with the youngest patients (18-29 years) having a 13.3% weight gain and the oldest patients (age greater than 50 years) having the lowest gain of 8.3% at 1 year (P = 0.047). Black recipients experienced a greater weight gain than whites during the first posttransplant year (14.6% vs. 9.0%; P = 0.043), and maintained or increased this difference over the 5-year period. Men and women experienced comparable weight gain during the first year (9.5% vs. 12.1%), but women continued to gain weight throughout the 5-year study (21.0% total weight gain). The men remained stable after the first year (10.8% total weight gain). Recipients who experienced at least a 10% weight gain also increased their serum cholesterol (mean 261 vs. 219) and triglyceride (mean 277 vs. 159) levels significantly, whereas those without weight gain did not. Weight gain did not correlate with cumulative steroid dose, donor source (living-related versus cadaver), rejection history, pre-existing obesity, the number of months on dialysis before transplantation, or posttransplant renal function. Posttransplant weight gain is related mainly to demographic factors, not to treatment factors associated with the transplant. The average weight gain during the first year after renal transplantation is approximately 10%. This increased weight, coupled with changes in lipid metabolism, may be significant in terms of altering risk from cardiovascular morbidity.

Author List

Johnson CP, Gallagher-Lepak S, Zhu YR, Porth C, Kelber S, Roza AM, Adams MB

Authors

Christopher P. Johnson MD Professor in the Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Allan M. Roza MD Professor in the Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
African Americans
African Continental Ancestry Group
Cholesterol
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Medical Records
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides
Weight Gain
Wisconsin
jenkins-FCD Prod-478 d1509cf07a111124a2d122fd3df854cc0b993c00