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Treatment Patterns in Women Age 80 and Over With DCIS: A Report From the National Cancer Database. Clin Breast Cancer 2022 Aug;22(6):547-552

Date

05/21/2022

Pubmed ID

35595612

DOI

10.1016/j.clbc.2022.04.004

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85130383287

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite an aging population, there are no established treatment guidelines for women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) age ≥80. Here we describe national treatment patterns and survival outcomes in older women with DCIS.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Women age ≥80 diagnosed with DCIS from 2005 to 2014 were identified using the National Cancer Database. χ2, Fisher's exact test, and logistic regression models were used to identify factors influencing receipt of breast surgery, and Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate overall survival (OS).

RESULTS: A total of 6,070 women with DCIS met inclusion criteria, of which the majority (98%) received surgery. Receipt of surgery was independently associated with age <90. OS was higher for those who received surgery compared to those who did not (HR 2.2 [1.72-2.83] P < .001).

CONCLUSION: The vast majority of patients age ≥80 with DCIS in the National Cancer Database received primary surgical management, which was associated with a significant OS benefit. Considering comorbidities and patient fitness, surgical resection should be considered for all patients age ≥80 who are suitable operative candidates.

Author List

Frebault J, Bergom C, Cortina CS, Shukla ME, Zhang Y, Huang CC, Kong AL

Authors

Chandler S. Cortina MD Assistant Professor in the Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Amanda L. Kong MD, MS Professor in the Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Monica E. Shukla MD Associate Professor in the Radiation Oncology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast
Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating
Female
Humans
Mastectomy
Mastectomy, Segmental
Proportional Hazards Models