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Validation of functional diffusion maps (fDMs) as a biomarker for human glioma cellularity. J Magn Reson Imaging 2010 Mar;31(3):538-48

Date

02/27/2010

Pubmed ID

20187195

Pubmed Central ID

PMC2903058

DOI

10.1002/jmri.22068

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-77649224700   188 Citations

Abstract

PURPOSE: To present comprehensive examinations of the assumptions made in functional diffusion map (fDM) analyses and provide a biological basis for fDM classification.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-nine patients with gliomas were enrolled in this study. To determine the sensitivity of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) to cellularity, cell density from stereotactic biopsy specimens was correlated with preoperative ADC maps. For definition of ADC thresholds used for fDMs, the 95% confidence intervals (CI) for changes in voxel-wise ADC measurements in normal appearing tissue was analyzed. The sensitivity and specificity to progressing disease was examined using both radiographic and neurological criteria.

RESULTS: Results support the hypothesis that ADC is inversely proportional to cell density with a sensitivity of 1.01 x 10(-7) [mm(2)/s]/[nuclei/mm(2)]. The 95% CI for white matter = 0.25 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s, gray matter = 0.31 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s, a mixture of white and gray matter = 0.40 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s, and a mixture of white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid = 0.75 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s. Application of these measurements as ADC thresholds produce varying levels of sensitivity and specificity to disease progression, which were all significantly better than chance.

CONCLUSION: This study suggests fDMs are valid biomarkers for brain tumor cellularity.

Author List

Ellingson BM, Malkin MG, Rand SD, Connelly JM, Quinsey C, LaViolette PS, Bedekar DP, Schmainda KM

Authors

Jennifer M. Connelly MD Professor in the Neurology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Peter LaViolette PhD Associate Professor in the Radiology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Kathleen M. Schmainda PhD Professor in the Biophysics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Brain Neoplasms
Computer Simulation
Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Female
Glioma
Humans
Image Enhancement
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and Specificity