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Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of children hospitalized with 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A infection. Pediatr Infect Dis J 2010 Jul;29(7):591-4

Date

07/01/2010

Pubmed ID

20589976

DOI

10.1097/inf.0b013e3181d73e32

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-77953251118   80 Citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In 2009, pandemic H1N1 influenza caused significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. We describe the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of children and adolescents hospitalized for 2009 H1N1 infections in Milwaukee, Wisconsin from April 2009 to August 2009.

METHODS: We conducted retrospective chart reviews of hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed 2009 H1N1 infections. Data on financial burden associated with these infections were obtained and analyzed.

RESULTS: A total of 75 children hospitalized for 2009 pandemic H1N1 infections were identified; the median age was 5 years (range, 2 months-19.2 years); 56% were males; 56% were Non-Hispanic Blacks; and 75%had at least one underlying medical condition. Twenty-four percent had only upper respiratory symptoms. Bacterial coinfections occurred in 1.3%.All but one patient received antivirals, 80% of patients received antibacterials,18.6% were admitted to the intensive care unit, 6% required mechanical ventilation, 2.6% required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation,and 2.6% died. The total charges incurred for H1N1 influenza hospitalizations were $4,454,191, with individual charges being highest for children > 12 years of age.

CONCLUSIONS: The majority of children with pandemic H1N1 influenza associated hospitalizations had uncomplicated illness despite the frequent presence of high-risk conditions in our patient population. Laboratory confirmed 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza hospitalizations resulted in substantial health care and economic burden during the first wave of the pandemic in spring 2009.

Author List

Kumar S, Havens PL, Chusid MJ, Willoughby RE Jr, Simpson P, Henrickson KJ

Authors

Peter L. Havens MD Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Kelly J. Henrickson MD Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Pippa M. Simpson PhD Chief, Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Rodney E. Willoughby MD Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adolescent
Age Distribution
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Antiviral Agents
Child
Child, Preschool
Critical Care
Disease Outbreaks
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Care Costs
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human
Male
Oxygen
Pneumonia, Bacterial
Respiration, Artificial
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Wisconsin
Young Adult