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Psychological adjustment in children after traumatic disfiguring injuries: a 12-month follow-up. Plast Reconstr Surg 2000 Dec;106(7):1451-8; discussion 1459-60

Date

12/29/2000

Pubmed ID

11129171

DOI

10.1097/00006534-200012000-00001

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-0033668697   40 Citations

Abstract

The psychological adjustment of 57 children (age range, 3 to 12 years) who sustained mutilating traumatic injuries to the face or upper or lower extremities was assessed over a 12-month interval. The injuries had occurred as a result of boating, lawn mower, or home accidents or dog bites. Within 5 days of the traumatic event, 98 percent of the children were symptomatic for posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, or anxiety. One month after the injury, 82 percent were symptomatic. Symptom frequency had declined by the time of the 3-month and 6-month evaluations, but 44 percent of the children continued to report symptoms at 12-month follow-up visits, and 21 percent met the diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder. Typical symptoms included flashbacks, fear of re-injury, mood disorders, body-image changes secondary to disfigurement, sleep disturbances, and anxiety. These findings support the importance of psychological evaluation and treatment of children who suffer mutilating injuries that require the attention of plastic surgeons.

Author List

Rusch MD, Grunert BK, Sanger JR, Dzwierzynski WW, Matloub HS

Authors

William W. Dzwierzynski MD Professor in the Plastic Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Brad K. Grunert PhD Professor in the Plastic Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Hani S. Matloub MD Professor in the Plastic Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Mark D. Rusch PhD Associate Professor in the Plastic Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin
James R. Sanger MD Professor in the Plastic Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Accidents, Home
Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Anxiety
Arm Injuries
Bites and Stings
Body Image
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Depression
Dogs
Facial Injuries
Fear
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Leg Injuries
Male
Memory
Mood Disorders
Prospective Studies
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Sleep Wake Disorders
Social Adjustment
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic