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Cognitive adaptation theory and quality of life in late-stage cancer patients. J Psychosoc Oncol 2013;31(3):266-81

Date

05/10/2013

Pubmed ID

23656255

DOI

10.1080/07347332.2013.778936

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-84877992036   9 Citations

Abstract

In this study, the question of whether using slightly illusionary, positive attributions of self, control, and meaning (e.g., cognitive adaptation theory), in the face of disconfirmatory evidence, facilitates quality of life in late-stage cancer patients was examined. Eighty late-stage cancer patients (Mean age = 59.7, SD = 12.5; 48.8% male, 51.2% female; varying cancer diagnoses) who recently failed or refused first line anti-neoplastic treatment completed questionnaires assessing meaning, control, self-esteem, and optimism, as well as physical and psychological quality of life. Findings suggest that greater self-esteem, control, and meaning predicted physical and psychological quality of life, with physical quality of life being influenced by control beliefs and psychological quality of life influenced by self-esteem. Optimism independently predicted physical quality of life and neither mediated nor moderated the relationship between cognitive adaptation and quality of life. Findings suggest that slightly positive, illusionary beliefs of self, control, and meaning predicted quality of life even in the presence of clear, disconfirmatory environmental evidence.

Author List

Christianson HF, Weis JM, Fouad NA

Author

Heidi F. Christianson PhD Associate Professor in the Psychiatry department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Neoplasms
Psychological Theory
Quality of Life
Young Adult