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Neuropsychological correlates of electroencephalograms in children with epilepsy. Epilepsy Res 2005 Mar-Apr;64(1-2):49-62

Date

04/26/2005

Pubmed ID

15847849

DOI

10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2005.02.007

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-19444364191   18 Citations

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: This study examined the degree to which neurophysiological activity on routine clinical EEG is associated with neuropsychological deficiencies in children with epilepsy.

METHODS: Ninety-five children with epilepsy (58 chronic, 37 recent-onset; mean age = 10.41 years, S.D. = 2.87 years; mean age at onset = 5.86 years, S.D. = 3.46 years) completed a neuropsychological battery. Neurophysiological data were collected from the most recent EEG.

RESULTS: In the recent-onset sample, no neuropsychological scores were related to any EEG variable. In the chronic sample, however, presence of slow-wave activity was related to memory impairment (p < 0.01). Post-hoc analyses on other neuropsychological measures showed localization of epileptiform activity (EA) might be related to verbal learning.

DISCUSSION: Children with slow-wave activity on EEG might be at increased risk for developing neuropsychological deficits. When these abnormalities are observed on a child's EEG, closer monitoring of cognitive and academic functioning seems warranted. Differences between these findings and past research suggest that conclusions drawn from adult surgical studies cannot be generalized to pediatric patients, especially recent-onset samples, without qualification. Differences between the recent-onset and chronic samples in this cross-sectional study raise the possibility that neurophysiological abnormalities have a cumulative effect on cognitive development.

Author List

Koop JI, Fastenau PS, Dunn DW, Austin JK

Author

Jennifer I. Koop Olsta PhD Professor in the Neurology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adolescent
Age of Onset
Analysis of Variance
Attention
Child
Cognition Disorders
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy
Female
Humans
Male
Memory
Neuropsychological Tests
Time Factors
Verbal Learning