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Joint hypermobility: a common association with complex functional gastrointestinal disorders. J Pediatr 2014 Nov;165(5):973-8

Date

08/26/2014

Pubmed ID

25151198

DOI

10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.07.021

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-84908328633 (requires institutional sign-in at Scopus site)   52 Citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of joint hypermobility (JH) and comorbid conditions in children and young adults referred to a tertiary care neurogastroenterology and autonomic disorders clinic for functional gastrointestinal complaints.

STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective chart review of 66 new patients aged 5-24 years who fulfilled at least 1 pediatric Rome III criteria for a functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) and had a recorded Beighton score (n = 45) or fibromyalgia tender point score (n = 45) based on physician examination. Comorbid symptoms were collected and autonomic testing was performed for evaluation of postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS).

RESULTS: The median patient age was 15 years (range, 5-24 years), 48 (73%) were females, and 56% had JH, a significantly higher rate compared with population studies of healthy adolescents (P < .001; OR, 10.03; 95% CI, 5.26-19.13). POTS was diagnosed in 34% of patients and did not correlate significantly with hypermobility. Comorbid conditions were common, including sleep disturbances (77%), chronic fatigue (93%), dizziness (94%), migraines (94%), chronic nausea (93%), and fibromyalgia (24%).

CONCLUSION: JH and other comorbid symptoms, including fibromyalgia, occur commonly in children and young adults with complex FGIDs. POTS is prevalent in FGIDs but is not associated with hypermobility. We recommend screening patients with complex FGIDs for JH, fibromyalgia, and comorbid symptoms such as sleep disturbances, migraines, and autonomic dysfunction.

Author List

Kovacic K, Chelimsky TC, Sood MR, Simpson P, Nugent M, Chelimsky G

Authors

Katja K. Karrento MD Associate Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Pippa M. Simpson PhD Adjunct Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Humans
Joint Instability
Male
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Wisconsin
Young Adult