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Using swing resistance and assistance to improve gait symmetry in individuals post-stroke. Hum Mov Sci 2015 Aug;42:212-24

Date

06/13/2015

Pubmed ID

26066783

Pubmed Central ID

PMC4508206

DOI

10.1016/j.humov.2015.05.010

Abstract

A major characteristic of hemiplegic gait observed in individuals post-stroke is spatial and temporal asymmetry, which may increase energy expenditure and the risk of falls. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of swing resistance/assistance applied to the affected leg on gait symmetry in individuals post-stroke. We recruited 10 subjects with chronic stroke who demonstrated a shorter step length with their affected leg in comparison to the non-affected leg during walking. They participated in two test sessions for swing resistance and swing assistance, respectively. During the adaptation period, subjects counteracted the step length deviation caused by the applied swing resistance force, resulting in an aftereffect consisting of improved step length symmetry during the post-adaptation period. In contrast, subjects did not counteract step length deviation caused by swing assistance during adaptation period and produced no aftereffect during the post-adaptation period. Locomotor training with swing resistance applied to the affected leg may improve step length symmetry through error-based learning. Swing assistance reduces errors in step length during stepping; however, it is unclear whether this approach would improve step length symmetry. Results from this study may be used to develop training paradigms for improving gait symmetry of stroke survivors.

Author List

Yen SC, Schmit BD, Wu M

Author

Brian Schmit PhD Professor in the Biomedical Engineering department at Marquette University




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
Aged
Biomechanical Phenomena
Braces
Efferent Pathways
Female
Gait
Gait Disorders, Neurologic
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Robotics
Stroke
Stroke Rehabilitation
Weight-Bearing