Medical College of Wisconsin
CTSICores SearchResearch InformaticsREDCap

Genes and environment in neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage. Semin Perinatol 2015 Dec;39(8):592-603

Date

10/31/2015

Pubmed ID

26516117

Pubmed Central ID

PMC4668116

DOI

10.1053/j.semperi.2015.09.006

Abstract

Emerging data suggest intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of the preterm neonate is a complex disorder with contributions from both the environment and the genome. Environmental analyses suggest factors mediating both cerebral blood flow and angiogenesis contribute to IVH, while candidate gene studies report variants in angiogenesis, inflammation, and vascular pathways. Gene-by-environment interactions demonstrate the interaction between the environment and the genome, and a non-replicated genome-wide association study suggests that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the risk for severe IVH in very low-birth weight preterm neonates.

Author List

Ment LR, Ådén U, Bauer CR, Bada HS, Carlo WA, Kaiser JR, Lin A, Cotten CM, Murray J, Page G, Hallman M, Lifton RP, Zhang H, Gene Targets for IVH Study Group and the Neonatal Research Network

Author

Girija Ganesh Konduri MD Chief, Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Apgar Score
Cerebral Ventricles
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Genome-Wide Association Study
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Pregnancy
Risk Factors
United States
jenkins-FCD Prod-478 d1509cf07a111124a2d122fd3df854cc0b993c00