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Equine-related injury: a retrospective analysis of outcomes over a 10-year period. Am J Surg 2008 May;195(5):702-4

Date

04/22/2008

Pubmed ID

18424291

DOI

10.1016/j.amjsurg.2007.11.007

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-42049084367   22 Citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Morbidity and financial loss caused by equine-related injuries may be significant. The purposes of this study were to determine the patterns of equine-related injury and the impact on outcomes.

METHODS: A 10-year retrospective review of equine-related injuries was performed. Age, gender, mechanism, injury severity score, Glasgow Coma Score, length of stay, surgical interventions, and mortality were assessed.

RESULTS: Of 80 emergency department evaluations, 76 patients were admitted and form the basis of this study. The most frequent mechanism of injury was fall (68%), followed by crush injuries (15%), kicks (8%), and trampling (5%). Musculoskeletal injuries were most common (64%). Thirty-eight (50%) patients required surgical intervention. Thirty-seven (52%) patients were discharged home; 34% required outpatient physical therapy, and 14% required inpatient rehabilitation. The mortality rate was 7%.

CONCLUSIONS: Equine-related injuries resulted in significant morbidity; most victims required outpatient or inpatient rehabilitation. The use of preventive strategies may minimize mortality and reduce the financial impact of postinjury morbidity.

Author List

Clarke CN, Tsuei BJ, Butler KL

Author

Callisia N. Clarke MD Assistant Professor in the Surgery department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Accidental Falls
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Craniocerebral Trauma
Female
Glasgow Coma Scale
Horses
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal System
Retrospective Studies