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Brief Report: Does Gender Matter in Intervention for ASD? Examining the Impact of the PEERS® Social Skills Intervention on Social Behavior Among Females with ASD. J Autism Dev Disord 2017 07;47(7):2282-2289

Date

04/10/2017

Pubmed ID

28391452

Pubmed Central ID

PMC6419962

DOI

10.1007/s10803-017-3121-5

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85017124050   14 Citations

Abstract

A paucity of research has been conducted to examine the effect of social skills intervention on females with ASD. Females with ASD may have more difficulty developing meaningful friendships than males, as the social climate can be more complex (Archer, Coyne, Personality and Social Psychology Review 9(3):212-230, 2005). This study examined whether treatment response among females differed from males. One hundred and seventy-seven adolescents and young adults with ASD (N = 177) participated in this study. When analyzed by group, no significant differences by gender emerged: PEERS® knowledge (TASSK/TYASSK, p = .494), direct interactions (QSQ, p = .762), or social responsiveness (SRS, p = .689; SSIS-RS, p = .482). Thus, females and males with ASD respond similarly to the PEERS® intervention.

Author List

McVey AJ, Schiltz H, Haendel A, Dolan BK, Willar KS, Pleiss S, Karst JS, Carson AM, Caiozzo C, Vogt E, Van Hecke AV

Authors

Jeffrey S. Karst PhD Assistant Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Amy Van Hecke PhD Assistant Professor in the Psychology department at Marquette University
Elisabeth M. Vogt PhD Assistant Professor in the Neurology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adolescent
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Female
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Psychotherapy
Sex Factors
Social Skills
Young Adult