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Forced vital capacity predicts morbidity and mortality in adults with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Congenit Heart Dis 2017 Jul;12(4):435-440

Date

05/04/2017

Pubmed ID

28464509

DOI

10.1111/chd.12470

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85018996596   6 Citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Abnormal lung function characterized by a reduced forced vital capacity (FVC) is common in adults with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and is associated with previous thoracotomies and sternotomies. The impact of abnormal lung function on clinical outcomes in adult patients with repaired TOF is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of abnormal lung function on the outcome of hospitalization and death in adults with repaired TOF when analyzed with other traditional cardiac risk factors.

DESIGN: Retrospective study of adults with repaired TOF, who underwent spirometry between 2000 and 2014. FVC < 60% of predicted was categorized as moderate-to-severely reduced lung function. Primary outcome measure was the combined clinical endpoint of death, cardiac transplantation, or nonelective hospitalization for primary cardiac or respiratory indication.

RESULTS: A total of 122 patients were included. Average age at spirometry testing was 31 ± 10.1 years. FVC was < 60% predicted in 23 (19%) patients. During a mean follow-up period of 3.97 ± 2.65 years, 23 (19%) patients reached the combined clinical outcome of nonelective hospitalization and/or death. FVC < 60% predicted was independently associated with the risk for the combined clinical outcome (RR 6.68 (95% CI 2.49-17.94), P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal pulmonary function characterized by reduced FVC is common in adults with repaired TOF. Patients with FVC < 60% predicted had a 6 times higher rate of hospitalization and/or death compared to those with FVC ≥ 60%.

Author List

Cohen KE, Buelow MW, Dixon J, Brazauskas R, Cohen SB, Earing MG, Ginde S

Authors

Ruta Brazauskas PhD Associate Professor in the Institute for Health and Equity department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Matthew W. Buelow MD Assistant Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Scott B. Cohen MD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Salil Ginde MD, MPH Associate Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Exercise Test
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forced Expiratory Volume
Humans
Lung
Male
Morbidity
Postoperative Period
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment
Spirometry
Survival Rate
Tetralogy of Fallot
Vital Capacity
Wisconsin