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Reliability and Repeatability of Cone Density Measurements in Patients With Stargardt Disease and RPGR-Associated Retinopathy. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2017 07 01;58(9):3608-3615

Date

07/25/2017

Pubmed ID

28738413

Pubmed Central ID

PMC5525557

DOI

10.1167/iovs.17-21904

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85026292711   17 Citations

Abstract

Purpose: To assess reliability and repeatability of cone density measurements by using confocal and (nonconfocal) split-detector adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) imaging. It will be determined whether cone density values are significantly different between modalities in Stargardt disease (STGD) and retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR)-associated retinopathy.

Methods: Twelve patients with STGD (aged 9-52 years) and eight with RPGR-associated retinopathy (aged 11-31 years) were imaged using both confocal and split-detector AOSLO simultaneously. Four graders manually identified cone locations in each image that were used to calculate local densities. Each imaging modality was evaluated independently. The data set consisted of 1584 assessments of 99 STGD images (each image in two modalities and four graders who graded each image twice) and 928 RPGR assessments of 58 images (each image in two modalities and four graders who graded each image twice).

Results: For STGD assessments the reliability for confocal and split-detector AOSLO was 67.9% and 95.9%, respectively, and the repeatability was 71.2% and 97.3%, respectively. The differences in the measured cone density values between modalities were statistically significant for one grader. For RPGR assessments the reliability for confocal and split-detector AOSLO was 22.1% and 88.5%, respectively, and repeatability was 63.2% and 94.5%, respectively. The differences in cone density between modalities were statistically significant for all graders.

Conclusions: Split-detector AOSLO greatly improved the reliability and repeatability of cone density measurements in both disorders and will be valuable for natural history studies and clinical trials using AOSLO. However, it appears that these indices may be disease dependent, implying the need for similar investigations in other conditions.

Author List

Tanna P, Kasilian M, Strauss R, Tee J, Kalitzeos A, Tarima S, Visotcky A, Dubra A, Carroll J, Michaelides M

Authors

Joseph J. Carroll PhD Director, Professor in the Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Sergey S. Tarima PhD Associate Professor in the Institute for Health and Equity department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adolescent
Adult
Cell Count
Child
Eye Proteins
Female
Humans
Macular Degeneration
Male
Microscopy, Confocal
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Ophthalmoscopy
Reproducibility of Results
Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells
Retinitis Pigmentosa
Tomography, Optical Coherence
jenkins-FCD Prod-480 9a4deaf152b0b06dd18151814fff2e18f6c05280