Medical College of Wisconsin
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Ascertaining educational outcomes after assessment in children with learning disorders. Clin Neuropsychol 2017 01;31(1):219-232

Date

10/13/2016

Pubmed ID

27730849

DOI

10.1080/13854046.2016.1244289

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-84991038024   5 Citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To survey educational outcomes after an interdisciplinary, neuropsychologically based team assessment for learning disorders.

METHOD: Parents of 137 children who underwent a comprehensive interdisciplinary neuropsychologically based assessment for learning problems completed an online survey one to four years later. Questions pertained broadly to school outcomes: positive or negative school responses, changes in special education services, and parental perceptions about the helpfulness of those services. These outcomes were examined in relation to demographic characteristics and parent satisfaction with the evaluation. We also obtained recent performance on state-based academic testing for descriptive purposes.

RESULTS: Parents reported that schools generally responded positively (78%), and 70% reported that their children had access to more or different special education services after the evaluation. Parents nearly uniformly (98%) viewed these services as helpful. Positive changes in education services were related to income (lower income received more services, p < .05) and parent satisfaction with the evaluation (p < .05). The intensity of special education services was strongly related to performance on state-based testing (p < .0001-p < .01).

CONCLUSIONS: School response is a relatively objective and meaningful metric of educational outcome after neuropsychologically based evaluation for children with learning problems.

Author List

Waber DP, Boiselle EC, Girard JM, Amaral JL, Forbes PW

Author

Joseph L. Amaral PhD Assistant Professor in the Neurology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Achievement
Adolescent
Child
Education, Special
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Parents
Personal Satisfaction
Schools
Surveys and Questionnaires