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Reduced Functional Connectivity Between the Hypothalamus and High-order Cortical Regions in Adolescent Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2017 11;65(5):516-519

Date

10/25/2017

Pubmed ID

29064927

Pubmed Central ID

PMC5657002

DOI

10.1097/MPG.0000000000001611

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85031328948   3 Citations

Abstract

The hypothalamus plays a critical role in maintaining visceral homeostasis. Altered hypothalamus activation has been implicated in functional gastrointestinal disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). One important aspect of homeostatic regulation is the cortical modulation of limbic and paralimbic subsystems, including the hypothalamus, which in turn affects the descending regulatory processes mediating visceral homeostasis. Using neuroimaging, we evaluated hypothalamus functional connectivity in adolescent patients with IBS and age-matched healthy controls who received rectal distension stimulations. More extensive hypothalamus connectivity was observed in liminal than subliminal condition in controls, but not in patients with IBS. Compared with controls, patients with IBS showed significantly reduced hypothalamus connectivity in the bilateral prefrontal cortices, supplementary motor and premotor areas, bilateral sensorimotor cortex, and limbic subareas, which are specifically involved in homeostatic regulation. The findings support the generalized homeostatic regulation model that reduced cortical and limbic modulations of hypothalamus functioning underlies disrupted visceral homeostasis in patients with IBS.

Author List

Liu X, Li SJ, Shaker R, Silverman A, Kern M, Ward DB, Li W, Xu Z, Chelimsky G, Sood MR

Authors

Shi-Jiang Li PhD Professor in the Biophysics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Reza Shaker MD Assoc Provost, Sr Assoc Dean, Ctr Dir, Chief, Prof in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Alan Silverman PhD Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adolescent
Cerebral Cortex
Child
Female
Homeostasis
Humans
Hypothalamus
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Male