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Outcomes of Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Performed in the Inpatient versus Outpatient Setting. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2019 04;25(4):827-833

Date

12/21/2018

Pubmed ID

30572109

DOI

10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.12.069

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85059680507   9 Citations

Abstract

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) is commonly performed as an inpatient procedure. The feasibility and outcomes of RIC allo-HCT in the outpatient setting is not known. We performed a single-center retrospective cohort study of patients aged ≥ 18years with hematologic malignancies who underwent RIC allo-HCT either in the inpatient or outpatient setting. Donor types included HLA-matched sibling and well-matched unrelated donors. The objectives were to compare the survival, complications, charges, and incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality (NRM), and acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) between the 2 groups. Between 2014 and 2017, 151 eligible patients were included, with 116 undergoing RIC allo-HCT in the inpatient setting and 35 patients undergoing RIC allo-HCT in the outpatient setting. Baseline characteristics were comparable between the 2 groups except for a higher proportion of patients with myeloma in the outpatient cohort (inpatient 15.5% versus outpatient 37.1%). The cumulative incidence of grades II to IV acute GVHD (inpatient 25.2% versus outpatient 25.7%), grades III to IV acute GVHD (inpatient 10.4% versus outpatient 8.5%), chronic GVHD (inpatient 38.3% versus outpatient 51.6%), NRM at 1 year (inpatient 10.8% versus outpatient 3.2%), and relapse (inpatient 24.8% versus outpatient 33.2%) did not significantly differ between the 2 cohorts. One-year progression-free survival (inpatient 64.4% versus outpatient 63.6%, P = .39) and overall survival (inpatient 73.8% versus outpatient 82.8%, P = .93) were also not significantly different between the 2 groups. The proportion of patients who developed neutropenic fever (inpatient 25.8% versus outpatient 8.5%, P = .03) and mucositis (inpatient 50.8% versus outpatient 8.5%, P < .001) and who required total parenteral nutrition (inpatient 20.6% versus outpatient 5.7%, P = .04) were more frequent in the inpatient cohort. About 51.5% of the outpatient cohort never required hospital admission in the first 100days. Outpatient HCT resulted in significantly lower charges than inpatient HCT in the first 100days (median charges: inpatient $339,621 versus outpatient $247,334; P < .001). On multivariate analysis the site of the HCT (outpatient versus inpatient) was not a significant predictor of either overall or progression-free survival. Outpatient RIC allo-HCT is feasible and safe with daily outpatient evaluation and aggressive supportive care resulting in outcomes comparable with those who received the transplant in the inpatient setting.

Author List

Guru Murthy GS, Hari PN, Szabo A, Pasquini M, Narra R, Khan M, Abedin S, Chhabra S, Dhakal B, D'Souza A, Drobyski WR, Rizzo JD, Runaas L, Shah NN, Shaw B, Saber W, Fenske T, Hamadani M

Authors

Sameem Abedin MD Assistant Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Saurabh Chhabra MD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Anita D'Souza MD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Binod Dhakal MD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
William R. Drobyski MD Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Timothy Fenske MD Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Guru Subramanian Guru Murthy MD Assistant Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Mehdi H. Hamadani MD Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Parameswaran Hari MD Chief, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Marcelo C. Pasquini MD, MS Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
J. Douglas D. Rizzo MD, MS Director, Center Associate Director, Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Lyndsey Runaas MD Assistant Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Wael Saber MD, MS Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Nirav N. Shah MD Associate Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Bronwen E. Shaw MBChB, PhD Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Aniko Szabo PhD Professor in the Institute for Health and Equity department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Aged
Female
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients
Retrospective Studies
Transplantation Conditioning
Transplantation, Homologous
jenkins-FCD Prod-482 91ad8a360b6da540234915ea01ff80e38bfdb40a