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X marks the spot: does it matter that O-GlcNAc transferase is an X-linked gene? Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2014 Oct 17;453(2):201-7

Date

06/25/2014

Pubmed ID

24960196

Pubmed Central ID

PMC4253714

DOI

10.1016/j.bbrc.2014.06.068

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-84906216635   14 Citations

Abstract

O-GlcNAcylation has emerged as a critical post-translational modification important for a wide array of cellular processes. This modification has been identified on a large pool of intracellular proteins that have wide-ranging roles, including transcriptional regulation, cell cycle progression, and signaling, among others. Interestingly, in mammals the single gene encoding O-GlcNAc Transferase (OGT) is located on the X-chromosome near the Xist locus suggesting that tight dosage regulation is necessary for normal development. Herein, we highlight the importance of OGT dosage and consider how its genomic location can contribute to a gender-specific increased risk for a number of diseases.

Author List

Olivier-Van Stichelen S, Abramowitz LK, Hanover JA

Author

Stephanie Olivier-Van Stichelen PhD Assistant Professor in the Biochemistry department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Acetylglucosamine
Animals
Dosage Compensation, Genetic
Embryonic Development
Female
Genes, X-Linked
Genomic Imprinting
Glycosylation
Humans
Male
Mice
Models, Biological
N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferases
Pregnancy
Protein Processing, Post-Translational
X Chromosome Inactivation