Medical College of Wisconsin
CTSICores SearchResearch InformaticsREDCap

COVID-19 in individuals with sickle cell disease/trait compared with other Black individuals. Blood Adv 2021 Apr 13;5(7):1915-1921

Date

04/02/2021

Pubmed ID

33792626

Pubmed Central ID

PMC8015795

DOI

10.1182/bloodadvances.2020003741

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85105201375   8 Citations

Abstract

In the United States, COVID-19 has disproportionately affected Black persons. Sickle cell disease (SCD) and sickle cell trait (SCT) are genetic conditions that occur predominantly among Black individuals. It is unknown if individuals with SCD/SCT are at higher risk of severe COVID-19 illness compared with Black individuals who do not have SCD/SCT. The objective of our study was to compare COVID-19 outcomes, including the disease manifestations, hospitalization, and death, among individuals with SCD/SCT vs Black individuals who do not have SCD/SCT. We leveraged electronic health record data from a multisite research network to identify Black patients with COVID-19 who have SCD/SCT and those who do not have SCD/SCT. During the study period of 20 January 2020 to 20 September 2020, there were 312 patients with COVID-19 and SCD and 449 patients with COVID-19 and SCT. There were 45‚ÄČ517 Black persons who were diagnosed with COVID-19 but who did not have SCD/SCT. After 1:1 propensity score matching (based on age, sex, and other preexisting comorbidities), patients with COVID-19 and SCD remained at a higher risk of hospitalization (relative risk [RR], 2.0; 95% CI, 1.5-2.7) and development of pneumonia (RR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.6-3.4) and pain (RR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.5-4.8) compared with Black persons without SCD/SCT. The case fatality rates for those with SCD compared with Black persons without SCD/SCT were not significantly different. There also were no significant differences in COVID-19 outcomes between individuals with SCT and Black persons without SCD/SCT within the matched cohorts.

Author List

Singh A, Brandow AM, Panepinto JA

Authors

Amanda Brandow DO Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Ashima Singh PhD Assistant Professor in the Pediatrics department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adolescent
Adult
African Americans
Anemia, Sickle Cell
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sickle Cell Trait
United States
Young Adult