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Parkinson's disease disrupts both automatic and controlled processing of action verbs. Brain Lang 2013 Oct;127(1):65-74

Date

08/23/2012

Pubmed ID

22910144

Pubmed Central ID

PMC3574625

DOI

10.1016/j.bandl.2012.07.008

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-84880963780   95 Citations

Abstract

The problem of how word meaning is processed in the brain has been a topic of intense investigation in cognitive neuroscience. While considerable correlational evidence exists for the involvement of sensory-motor systems in conceptual processing, it is still unclear whether they play a causal role. We investigated this issue by comparing the performance of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) with that of age-matched controls when processing action and abstract verbs. To examine the effects of task demands, we used tasks in which semantic demands were either implicit (lexical decision and priming) or explicit (semantic similarity judgment). In both tasks, PD patients' performance was selectively impaired for action verbs (relative to controls), indicating that the motor system plays a more central role in the processing of action verbs than in the processing of abstract verbs. These results argue for a causal role of sensory-motor systems in semantic processing.

Author List

Fernandino L, Conant LL, Binder JR, Blindauer K, Hiner B, Spangler K, Desai RH

Authors

Jeffrey R. Binder MD Professor in the Neurology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Lisa L. Conant PhD Associate Professor in the Neurology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Leonardo Fernandino PhD Assistant Professor in the Neurology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Adult
Aged
Brain
Comprehension
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Judgment
Language
Language Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Parkinson Disease
Reaction Time