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Phosphatidylethanolamine is externalized at the surface of microparticles. Biochim Biophys Acta 2012 Dec;1821(12):1501-7

Date

09/11/2012

Pubmed ID

22960380

Pubmed Central ID

PMC3809829

DOI

10.1016/j.bbalip.2012.08.017

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-84866500244 (requires institutional sign-in at Scopus site)   50 Citations

Abstract

Microparticles (MPs) are membrane-bound vesicles shed normally or as a result of various (pathological) stimuli. MPs contain a wealth of bio-active macromolecules. Aminophospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) is present on the surface of many MPs. As PS and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) are related, yet distinct aminophospholipids, the purpose of this study was to systematically and directly assess PE exposure on MPs. We examined MPs from various human cellular sources (human breast cancer, endothelial, red and white blood cells) by flow cytometry using a PE-specific probe, duramycin, and two PS-specific probes, annexin V and lactadherin. PS and PE exposure percentage was comparable on vascular and blood cell-derived MPs (80-90% of MP-gated events). However, the percentage of malignant breast cancer MPs exposing PE (~90%) was significantly higher than PS (~50%). Thus, while PS and PE exposure can result from a general loss of membrane asymmetry, there may also be distinct mechanisms of PE and PS exposure on MPs that vary by cellular source.

Author List

Larson MC, Woodliff JE, Hillery CA, Kearl TJ, Zhao M

Author

Tyce J. Kearl MD, PhD Assistant Professor in the Medicine department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Bacteriocins
Biotin
Blood Coagulation
Breast Neoplasms
Cell Line, Tumor
Cell Membrane
Cell-Derived Microparticles
Cells, Cultured
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Endothelial Cells
Erythrocytes
Flow Cytometry
Humans
Microscopy, Confocal
Peptides
Phosphatidylethanolamines