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Role of extra-esophageal reflux in chronic otitis media with effusion. Laryngoscope 2007 Aug;117(8):1419-23

Date

06/23/2007

Pubmed ID

17585281

DOI

10.1097/MLG.0b013e318064f177

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-34548462940   72 Citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the most common cause of childhood hearing loss. Despite its prevalence, the enormous health care expenditures resulting from its treatment, and the increasing therapeutic challenges imposed by antimicrobial resistance, very little is known regarding the cellular and molecular immunologic and inflammatory events in this disease process. Extra-esophageal reflux (EER) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic OME. The objective of this study was to confirm that children with OME have EER into the middle ear as measured by the presence of pepsin in middle ear effusions (MEE) removed during tympanostomy tube (TT) placement.

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, translational, cell biological research study.

METHODS: MEE were obtained from children undergoing TT placement for OME. The fluid was lysed in a urea buffer and the presence of pepsin quantitatively determined by Western blot analysis using a specific antipepsin antibody. The pH of the samples was recorded before lysis.

RESULTS: Pepsin protein was detected in 18 of 32 (56%) samples analyzed, with 12 of 20 (60%) patients having at least one positive sample for pepsin. Pepsin levels ranged from 80 to 1,000 ng/mL. The pH of the samples ranged from 6.0 to 7.6, with a mean pH of 6.8.

CONCLUSIONS: Pepsin was detected in 60% of patients with OME, confirming that EER into the middle ear occurs in these children. The pepsin present would have little or no activity at pH 6.0 to 7.6; however, pepsin is stable below pH 8.0 and thus could be reactivated after a decrease in pH.

Author List

Crapko M, Kerschner JE, Syring M, Johnston N

Authors

Nikki Johnston PhD Associate Professor in the Otolaryngology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
Joseph E. Kerschner MD Provost, Executive Vice President, Dean, Professor in the School of Medicine Administration department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Biomarkers
Blotting, Western
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Infant
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Middle Ear Ventilation
Otitis Media with Effusion
Pepsin A
Prospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
jenkins-FCD Prod-480 9a4deaf152b0b06dd18151814fff2e18f6c05280