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The Gut Microbiome, Energy Homeostasis, and Implications for Hypertension. Curr Hypertens Rep 2017 Apr;19(4):27

Date

03/21/2017

Pubmed ID

28316052

Pubmed Central ID

PMC5773096

DOI

10.1007/s11906-017-0721-6

Scopus ID

2-s2.0-85015782153   15 Citations

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The influence of gut bacteria upon host physiology is increasingly recognized, but mechanistic links are lacking. Diseases of energetic imbalance such as obesity and diabetes represent major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. Thus, here, we review current mechanistic contributions of the gut microbiota to host energetics.

RECENT FINDINGS: Gut bacteria generate a multitude of small molecules which can signal to host tissues within and beyond the gastrointestinal tract to influence host physiology, and gut bacteria can also influence host digestive efficiency by altering the bioavailability of polysaccharides, yet the quantitative energetic effects of these processes remain unclear. Recently, our team has demonstrated that gut bacteria constitute a major anaerobic thermogenic biomass, which can quantitatively account for obesity. Quantitative understanding of the mechanisms by which gut bacteria influence energy homeostasis may ultimately inform the relationship between gut bacteria and cardiovascular dysfunction.

Author List

Riedl RA, Atkinson SN, Burnett CML, Grobe JL, Kirby JR

Authors

Justin L. Grobe PhD Associate Professor in the Physiology department at Medical College of Wisconsin
John Kirby PhD Chair, Center Associate Director, Professor in the Microbiology and Immunology department at Medical College of Wisconsin




MESH terms used to index this publication - Major topics in bold

Animals
Cardiovascular Diseases
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Gastrointestinal Tract
Homeostasis
Humans
Hypertension
Obesity